Domestic violence challenge and COVID-19 pandemic

  • Marzieh Nojomi Preventive Medicine and Public Health Research Center, Psychosocial Health Research Institute, Department of Community and Family Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Islamic Republic of.
  • Ebrahim Babaee | babaeeebrahim@yahoo.com Preventive Medicine and Public Health Research Center, Department of Community Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Islamic Republic of. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7969-9122

Abstract

By the emergence of the COVID-19 transfers and relocation of people to prevent the spread of infection have been restricted. Long term staying at home during an epidemic increases the probability of interpersonal friction and conflict. During this time, the family members get close together and interactions between family members may be increased. Restricting people's movements during an epidemic can lead to psychological consequences such as stress, anxiety, and domestic violence consequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) emphasis that with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, anxiety, and stress have increased worldwide notably.

Dimensions

Altmetric

PlumX Metrics

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

References

1. Organization WH. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Pandemic. Country & Technical Guidance - Coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
2. Stress and Coping: CDC; 2020 [Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-life-coping/managing-stress-anxiety.html.
3. Found UNP. COVID-19 a Gender Lens: Protecting sexual and reproductive health and rights and
promoting gender equality. 2020.
4. Alves PMR, de Oliveira CJB, de Oliveira TRN, Barbosa KB, Marcene HC, de Oliveira SV. COVID-19: Isolations, Quarantines and Domestic Violence in Rural Areas. SciMedicine Journal. 2020;2(1):44-5.
5. Organization WH. COVID-19 and violence against women: what the health sector/system can do, 7 April 2020. World Health Organization; 2020.
6. Nations U. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). This is the moment to step up for the vulnerable [Available from: https://www.un.org/en/un-coronavirus-communications-team/moment-step-vulnerable.
7. Allen-Ebrahimian B. China’s Domestic Violence Epidemic 2020 [Available from: https://www.axios.com/china-domestic-violencecoronavirus-quarantine-7b00c3ba-35bc-4d16-afdd-b76ecfb28882.html.
8. Godin M. As Cities Around the World Go on Lockdown, Victims of Domestic Violence Look for a Way Out 2020 [Available from: https://time.com/5803887/coronavirus-domestic-violence-victims/.
9. Zhang W. Domestic Violence Cases Surge During COVID-19 Epidemic 2020 [Available from: https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1005253/domestic-violence-cases-surge-during-covid-19-epidemic.
10. Organization WH. Practical considerations and recommendations for religious leaders and faith-based communities in the context of COVID-19: interim guidance, 7 April 2020. World Health Organization; 2020.
11. Chaudhari A, Patel J, Savla K, Shetty A, Shah V, editors. Women’s Safety Band Using IoT. Proceedings of International Conference on Wireless Communication; 2020: Springer.
Published
2020-10-14
Info
Issue
Section
Letters
Keywords:
Domestic violence, COVID-19, women
Statistics
  • Abstract views: 80

  • PDF: 41
  • HTML: 0
How to Cite
Nojomi, M., & Babaee, E. (2020). Domestic violence challenge and COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Public Health Research, 9(4). https://doi.org/10.4081/jphr.2020.1853